WordPress

Moving from WordPress to Ghost

Although I like WordPress, it is bloated for just a simple blog. This is one of the reasons I've gone back to using Ghost as my blogging platform. Another reason is the fact that I'm using JS in my daily job, so I just as well stick with it in my spare time. Migrating from WordPress to Ghost was easy. Just install the Ghost export plugin on your WordPress install, and follow the instructions. You also have to update your posts images, and upload them to your Ghost install. After…

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WordPress and Nginx

This is just a small writeup on setting up WordPress on a Nginx server running Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. The prerequisite is also that is has PHP and MySql. Basically this post is a summary of my other posts on WP and Nginx. So with the basic stuff out of the way let us jump right in to the nitty-gritty of the setup. I’ll assume that you set up the vhost manually and edit the file with a sudo user in the terminal of the server. I’ll have…

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More Nginx and WordPress challenges [updated]

As I was writing about in the last post, there where some problems getting every thing to work with WP, Ubuntu and Nginx. One of the problems I got, was kind of a biggie. TL;DR; Having problem with Nginx running WordPress and xmlrpc.php POST requests? Check that the fastcgi_params is included in your nginx.conf. WordPress in it self is a very good and popular platform for publishing to the web. And the web interface has matured over the years, and are a real treat to use.…

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WordPress on Nginx

Running WordPress on server with Nginx is not a problem. However getting “pretty” permalinks can be a challenge. What you need to do, is to add an extra directive to your vhost setting for the domain you host your blog on. Depending on how you’ve set up your blog the way varies. If you’ve done it the hard core way in terminal using wget, tar and vi – you probably already know what to do… If you are using software like ISPConfig, you need to edit the nginx Directives…

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Changes

After moving all my sites from Linode over to DigitalOcean, I’ve also moved from the Ghost platform back to WordPress(.org). I’ve also gone from Apache to Nginx because I just wanted to try something new. My Gitlab instance (found at https://gitlab.no) has been changed from Gitlab(!) to Gogs. Both because I wanted something new to play with, but also because Gitlab is a resource “eater”. Gogs is a lightweight system written in GO and despite having some quirks (can’t force HTTPS) it suits my…

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